June Magi Lectures

Seeing Reality:

Conversations in Science, Faith, and Philosophy

How do we understand the universe and our place within it?  To what extent should our answer to that fundamental question be different whether we approach it as scientist, philosopher, or theologian?  What are the methodological differences that must be respected and which frameworks could enable them to fit together into a coherent whole? Faced with the widespread fragmentation of disciplines, how can we seek fruitful exchanges of insight in the modern academy? 

This one-week Collegium Summer Seminar will address these questions, through a daily series of lectures in which students will examine both cutting edge research and foundational wisdom that enables them to evaluate descriptive models of the universe, the relationship of space and time, freedom and determinism, physics and metaphysics, nature and grace, the human and the divine.

Public Lectures

Select lectures are free and open to the public. The Magi Project welcomes guests to explore themes of science, faith, and philosophy any or all of the following lectures. Morning lectures begin promptly at 9AM and afternoon lectures at 2PM.

Read More

Penn Catholic Community Brunch

 

When: Sunday, May 14th at 10:30am

Where: Penn Newman Catholic Center

              3720 Chestnut St, Phila, Pa, 19114

The Collegium Institute and the Penn Newman Center invite all alumni, family, and friends to join us for Sunday brunch. Reconnect with old friends and meet new ones; learn about the surprising new movements afoot in the university where the Newman movement first started; and hear remarks from

Dr. Christopher Roberts

Collegium’s Theologian-in-Residence AY 2016-2017

Literature and the Catholic Imagination

The brunch will immediately follow the 9:30AM Mass celebrated at St. Agatha-St. James Church.

Please RSVP HERE

For inquiries, you may contact Elizabeth Feeney at elife@sas.upenn.edu.


Dr. Christopher Roberts

Dr. Roberts is Theologian-in-Residence for the Collegium Institute during academic year, 2016-17.  Before coming to the Collegium Institute, Dr. Roberts taught in the Ethics Program at Villanova University and served as the primary editor and writer for the World Meeting of Families Catechism, Love is our Mission: the Family Fully Alive. For several years he was a television journalist at PBS, including time as a reporter for the program Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly. Dr. Roberts is a graduate of Yale (BA, Religious Studies and Environmental Studies), Oxford (MPhil, Christian Ethics) and the University of London (PhD, Theology). When his diaconate training concludes in 2017, he will also receive a further MA in theology from St. Charles Borromeo Seminary here in Philadelphia.

 

Penn Newman Catholic Community

Serving the Penn Catholic Community since 1893, the Newman Center’s mission to support, challenge, inspire and empower students, faculty and staff to live the Gospel of Jesus Christ on campus, preparing Catholic leaders for service to the Church and world.

Poetry as Enchantment

Annual Humanities Symposium
& a Paideia Seminar

When: Friday, April 21st at 5pm

Where: University of Pennsylvania

Join Collegium Institute and undergraduates across Philadelphia for this final session of Enchantment and Disenchantment in the Modern Era.  For our closing seminar, we will examine Poetry as Enchantment, under the esteemed direction of poets Prof. James M. Wilson and Chaplain Chaz Howard.  Through a poetry reading and discussion of literary criticisms, Dr. Wilson and Dr. Howard will guide us in an exploration of poetry, religion, and philosophy.

Please direct questions and RSVPs for this dinner to Elizabeth Feeney at elife@sas.upenn.edu.

Information about past sessions in this Paideia series may be found here.


As poets and scholars, this month’s guest speakers explore ideas of inspiration through the medium of poetry.  Dr. James Wilson (Villanova) blends his poetic work with his scholarship in religion, literature, and philosophy, while Dr. Chaz Howard (UPenn) enlists his various chaplaincy experiences from hospitals to universities to examine the human experience.

Professor James M. Wilson

James Matthew Wilson is Associate Professor of Religion and Literature in the Department of Humanities and Augustinian Traditions at Villanova University.  An award-winning scholar of philosophical-theology and literature, he has authored dozens of essays, articles, and reviews on subjects ranging from art, ethics, and politics, to meter and poetic form, from the importance of local culture to the nature of truth, goodness, and beauty.  Wilson is also a poet and critic of contemporary poetry, whose work appears regularly in such magazines and journals The New Criterion, Dappled Things, Measure, The Weekly Standard, Front Porch Republic, The Raintown Review, and The American Conservative, as well as in his six published books of poetry and scholarship.

 

 

Chaplain Chaz Howard

Dr. Chaz Howard is the University Chaplain at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to his service at Penn, he served as a chaplain in hospice and hospital and as a street outreach worker to individuals experiencing homelessness in Philadelphia. His writing has been featured in such publications as Black Arts Quarterly, Black Theology: An International Journal, Daily Good, Christianity Today’s Leadership Journal, and Slate.  He is the editor of The Souls of Poor Folk, which explored new ways of considering homelessness and poverty and The Awe and The Awful, a poetry collection, among others.   He shares life with his beloved wife, Dr. Lia C. Howard and their three daughters.  He sees his vocational calling to be to work for a communal increase in joy, peace, justice and love.

 

 

On Caring for Depression in our Patients and Ourselves

an Open Conversation about both Illness and Wellness

A How to Heal luncheon

When: Thurs, April 20, 1-2:00pm

Where: Jordan Medical Education Bldg, 503

This month, guest speakers Dr. Phil Gehrman, (Penn Sleep Center) and Dr. Richard Summers (Co-Director of Residency Training and Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, UPenn) come together to share how their ultimate sense of life and of human flourishing influences how they understand and treat depression.

This series in Medical Humanities is a monthly luncheon seminar that invites students across the healthcare community to engage with veteran practitioners and faculty on concrete, clinical issues that prompt more fundamental questions: what does it mean to heal? how does one measure wellness? how do doctors and nurses determine when their responsibility for making someone well is complete?  How is the flourishing of patient and caregiver related — or not?

RSVP to Program Coordinator, Elizabeth Feeney at elife@sas.upenn.

Information about past luncheons can be found here.


 

Dr. Phil Gehrman, Ph.D.             Dr. Richard Summers, MD 

Fourth Annual Anscombe Lecture in Ethics

When: Wed, April 5th, noon-1:30pm

Where: Terrace Room, Claudia Cohen Hall

249 S 36th Street

The Annual Anscombe Lecture in Ethics commemorates Elizabeth Anscombe (1919-2001), former Penn Professor of Philosophy and one of the most influential woman philosophers and Catholic intellectuals of the modern era.  

featuring:

Sir Roger Scruton

on

Art and Morality: on the Relationship between Aesthetics and Ethics

This year’s lecture is cosponsored by the Penn Departments of Philosophy and History, as well as the Program for Research in Religion and Urban Civil Society (PRRUCS).

Lunch provided. To reserve your place, register HERE.  For more information, contact Elizabeth Feeney: elife@sas.upenn.edu.


Sir Roger Scruton

Eminent writer and philosopher, Prof Sir Roger Scruton has for over three decades taught at institutions on both sides of the Atlantic including Birkbeck College, Boston University, and more recently, the University of Buckingham. He is an author of over forty books. In his work as a philosopher he has specialized in aesthetics with particular attention to music and architecture. He has written several works of fiction, as well as memoirs and essays on topics of general interest. He engages in contemporary political and cultural debates from the standpoint of a conservative thinker and is well known as a powerful polemicist. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and the British Academy. He has been officially honoured by the Czech Republic, by the City of Plzen and by Virginia’s General Assembly. In 2004 he received the Ingersoll Weaver Prize for Scholarly Letters. In 2015 he published 3 books all of which were chosen among people’s ‘books of the year’. In 2016 he was recipient of the Polish Lech Kaczynski Foundation’s Medal for Courage and Integrity, was awarded the Italian Masi Prize for the Culture of Wine in recognition of his book I Drink Therefore I Am (Bevo, dunque sono), and was knighted in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List.

CwtC Module V: On Science, Faith, and Culture: Conflict and Reconciliation

When: Wednesday, March 15, 22, and 29

Where: Harrison College House

How can ancient creation narratives be understood in light of modern astrophysics?  What does the experience of the founder of modern physics (Galileo) actually reveal about the relationship between science and the church?  Or the experience of the founder of the Big Bang Theory (LeMaitre) reveal about the relationship between science and the state?  How is religious belief still possible for scientists in the modern age? Has Cosmology become the “Religion for Intelligent atheists?”

Join us on a great adventure as we journey through intellectual history exploring the relationship between science, faith and culture.  Through a discussion of very brief but momentous texts, we’ll be asking ourselves deep and searching questions about the interaction of science and religious belief and about how this relationship has been portrayed, accepted and rejected in popular culture in times past and in the present day.

This informal dinner seminar is directed by Penn astrophysicist and Collegium Faculty Fellow, Dr. Marisa Cristina March.  Please contact elife@sas.upenn.edu with any questions. All dinner and texts provided.

How to Heal

A New Medical Humanities Series

This new series in Medical Humanities is a monthly luncheon seminar that invites students across the healthcare community to engage with veteran practitioners and faculty on concrete, clinical issues that prompt more fundamental questions: what does it mean to heal? how does one measure wellness? how do doctors and nurses determine when their responsibility for making someone well is complete?  How is the flourishing of patient and caregiver related — or not?

Please join Collegium for the inaugural luncheon seminar:  

Integral Healing?
To what extent should clinicians be concerned with
both body and spirit?
Featuring
Dr. Brian Wojciechowski
President, Catholic Medical Association of Philadelphia
Thurs, January 19th at noon
Jordan Medical Education Center
Lunch will be provided.

To register or for more information, please contact Elizabeth Feeney at elife@sas.upenn.edu.

 

Sacred Songs: an Evening of Music and Reflection

 with Composer and Professor of Music James Primosch

co-sponsored by the Penn Department of Music

When: Monday, January 23rd at 5:30pm

Where: Lerner Center, Room 101

201 South 34th Street

Penn faculty composer James Primosch presents a lecture/recital on his vocal music, featuring live performances by soprano Mary Mackenzie and pianist Eric Sedgwick.

In Primosch's work, idioms from 20th/21st century traditions intersect with materials gleaned from his work as a liturgical musician. While some of the songs provide fresh settings for old liturgical melodies and texts, others set contemporary poetry with newly devised music. The result is concert music that also fulfills a pastoral function, serving as a space for contemplation, and an act of praise.

Reception to Follow

Please RSVP HERE for this event.


james-primosch-full-photo

James Primosch studied composition at Cleveland State University, the University of Pennsylvania and Columbia University. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and multiple awards from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, his music has been performed by the Chicago Symphony, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, and soprano Dawn Upshaw, among many other ensembles and soloists. 20 of his compositions have been released on compact disc. He has served on the Penn faculty since 1988.

mary mack

Mary Mackenzie, soprano

eric sed

Eric Sedgwick, piano

 

How Catholic Places Serve Civic Purposes: the Archdiocese of Philadelphia’s Economic “Halo Effects”

Wednesday, November 30th at 5:30pm
Penn Hillel, 2nd Floor
215 S. 39th St, Phila, PA, 19104

Cosponsor: Program for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society

Join Collegium Institute and the Program for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society (PRRUCS) as we mark the release of the new PRRUCS Report on Catholic Nonprofits in Philadelphia.  Keynote speaker, Most Rev. Charles J. Chaput, the Archbishop of Philadelphia, will reflect on the mission and significance of religious non-profits in history, and on their evolving place in civil society in the present.  The panel of scholars and non-profit leaders, moderated by Professor Ram Cnaan of Penn’s School of Social Policy & Practice, will then consider more specifically the contours of the “halo effect” that Catholic institutions in particular are supposed to be generating in Philadelphia today.

Keynote speaker: Charles J. Chaput, Archbishop of Philadelphia

Moderator: Dr. Ram Cnaan, Program Director, Program for Religion and Social Policy Research

Panelists:

~Joseph P. Tierney, Executive Director, Robert A. Fox Leadership Program

~Lorraine M. Knight, Executive Director, Nutritional Development Services, Archdiocese of Philadelphia

~A. Robert Jaeger, President, Partners for Sacred Places

Reception to Follow

RSVP HERE to attend this lecture.


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput joined the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin, St. Augustine Province, in 1965.  He was appointed Archbishop of Denver in 1997, and later appointed Archbishop of Philadelphia in 2011.

During his ministry, he has assisted in the founding of St. John Vianney Theological Seminary, an affiliate of the Pontifical Lateran University, as well as Centro San Juan Diego in Colorado, the national Catholic Association of Latino Leaders (CALL), and ENDOW, a leadership initiative of Catholic women to “Educate on the Nature and Dignity of Women.” He was also instrumental in creating the Denver-based Augustine Institute, an independent, lay-run graduate school for the formation of lay Catholic leaders, catechists, and evangelizers. Archbishop Chaput has served on various national and international committees for advancing religious freedom, in addition to serving as a board member for various Catholic educational institutions.  For the United States Catholic Conference of Bishops, Archbishop Chaput is currently Chair of the Subcommittee on Native American Catholics, and a member and consultant for several other committees.

In addition to numerous talks, pastoral letter, and articles, he has authored two books: Living the Catholic Faith: Rediscovering the Basics (Servant, 2001) and Render Unto Caesar: Serving the Nation by Living Our Catholic Beliefs in Political Life (Doubleday, 2008).

 

Dr. Ram A. Cnaan is a Professor and Director, Program for Religion and Social Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Policy & Practice. He is also the founder and Faculty Director the Goldring Reentry Initiative which works to reduce recidivism. Professor Cnaan received his doctorate degree from the School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh, and his B.S.W. and M.S.W. (both cum laude) from the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel. Professor Cnaan has published numerous articles in scientific journals on a variety of social issues (mainly faith-based organizations, volunteerism, social policy, and development) and serves on the editorial boards of 11 academic journals, as well as authored or edited several academic books.

Professor Cnaan is considered an international expert in the areas of faith-based social care, volunteering, prisoners’ reentry, and social policy. He lectures widely and teaches regularly in four countries.

 

Program for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society

The PRRUCS mission is to translate Benjamin Franklin’s timeless yet timely nonsectarian civic vision for Penn and for American democracy itself—a nonsectarian civic vision that models both robust respect for religious pluralism and a bedrock belief that sacred places, both on their own and via public-private partnerships, can and should serve secular purposes unto “the common good”—into a 21st century, university-anchored agenda of fact-based research on urban and other faith-based organizations; survey research on religion and democratic values in America; arts and sciences teaching relevant to religion; service-learning initiatives; and special events and projects that advance knowledge and promote mutual understanding concerning contemporary America’s most complex and contentious church-state issues.

On the Secular University and the Church: Reconsidering Newman’s Philosophy of Education Today

When: Thursday, October 13th at 7:00pm

Where: Penn Newman Catholic Center

3720 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA, 19104

Co-sponsored by Penn Newman Catholic Community

Please join Collegium Institute and the Penn Newman Catholic Community for this historic inaugural lecture, the first part of an annual series that marks the legacy of the University of Pennsylvania as the site of the first Newman Club in America.

Dr. Don Briel is the founder, and was for 20 years director, of the Center for Catholic Studies at the University of Saint Thomas in Saint Paul, Minnesota, which was the first such Center of its kind.  He has since led efforts to develop similar programs at both Catholic and secular research universities across the country.  At the University of St. Thomas he also held the Koch Chair of Catholic Studies and was the first non-clergyman to hold the Chair of the Theology Department.   He served for a time as Assistant Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.  He now holds the Blessed John Henry  Newman Chair of Liberal Arts at the University of Mary.

Reception to Follow the Lecture

Please Register Here.  Any questions may be directed to Elizabeth Feeney at elife@sas.upenn.edu.

The text and video of Dr. Briel’s lecture can be found HERE.