How to Heal

A New Medical Humanities Series

This new series in Medical Humanities is a monthly luncheon seminar that invites students across the healthcare community to engage with veteran practitioners and faculty on concrete, clinical issues that prompt more fundamental questions: what does it mean to heal? how does one measure wellness? how do doctors and nurses determine when their responsibility for making someone well is complete?  How is the flourishing of patient and caregiver related — or not?

Please join Collegium for the inaugural luncheon seminar:  

Integral Healing?
To what extent should clinicians be concerned with
both body and spirit?
Featuring
Dr. Brian Wojciechowski
President, Catholic Medical Association of Philadelphia
Thurs, January 19th at noon
Jordan Medical Education Center
Lunch will be provided.

To register or for more information, please contact Elizabeth Feeney at elife@sas.upenn.edu.

 

How Catholic Places Serve Civic Purposes: the Archdiocese of Philadelphia’s Economic “Halo Effects”

Wednesday, November 30th at 5:30pm
Penn Hillel, 2nd Floor
215 S. 39th St, Phila, PA, 19104

Cosponsor: Program for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society

Join Collegium Institute and the Program for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society (PRRUCS) as we mark the release of the new PRRUCS Report on Catholic Nonprofits in Philadelphia.  Keynote speaker, Most Rev. Charles J. Chaput, the Archbishop of Philadelphia, will reflect on the mission and significance of religious non-profits in history, and on their evolving place in civil society in the present.  The panel of scholars and non-profit leaders, moderated by Professor Ram Cnaan of Penn’s School of Social Policy & Practice, will then consider more specifically the contours of the “halo effect” that Catholic institutions in particular are supposed to be generating in Philadelphia today.

Keynote speaker: Charles J. Chaput, Archbishop of Philadelphia

Moderator: Dr. Ram Cnaan, Program Director, Program for Religion and Social Policy Research

Panelists:

~Joseph P. Tierney, Executive Director, Robert A. Fox Leadership Program

~Lorraine M. Knight, Executive Director, Nutritional Development Services, Archdiocese of Philadelphia

~A. Robert Jaeger, President, Partners for Sacred Places

Reception to Follow

RSVP HERE to attend this lecture.


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput joined the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin, St. Augustine Province, in 1965.  He was appointed Archbishop of Denver in 1997, and later appointed Archbishop of Philadelphia in 2011.

During his ministry, he has assisted in the founding of St. John Vianney Theological Seminary, an affiliate of the Pontifical Lateran University, as well as Centro San Juan Diego in Colorado, the national Catholic Association of Latino Leaders (CALL), and ENDOW, a leadership initiative of Catholic women to “Educate on the Nature and Dignity of Women.” He was also instrumental in creating the Denver-based Augustine Institute, an independent, lay-run graduate school for the formation of lay Catholic leaders, catechists, and evangelizers. Archbishop Chaput has served on various national and international committees for advancing religious freedom, in addition to serving as a board member for various Catholic educational institutions.  For the United States Catholic Conference of Bishops, Archbishop Chaput is currently Chair of the Subcommittee on Native American Catholics, and a member and consultant for several other committees.

In addition to numerous talks, pastoral letter, and articles, he has authored two books: Living the Catholic Faith: Rediscovering the Basics (Servant, 2001) and Render Unto Caesar: Serving the Nation by Living Our Catholic Beliefs in Political Life (Doubleday, 2008).

 

Dr. Ram A. Cnaan is a Professor and Director, Program for Religion and Social Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Policy & Practice. He is also the founder and Faculty Director the Goldring Reentry Initiative which works to reduce recidivism. Professor Cnaan received his doctorate degree from the School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh, and his B.S.W. and M.S.W. (both cum laude) from the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel. Professor Cnaan has published numerous articles in scientific journals on a variety of social issues (mainly faith-based organizations, volunteerism, social policy, and development) and serves on the editorial boards of 11 academic journals, as well as authored or edited several academic books.

Professor Cnaan is considered an international expert in the areas of faith-based social care, volunteering, prisoners’ reentry, and social policy. He lectures widely and teaches regularly in four countries.

 

Program for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society

The PRRUCS mission is to translate Benjamin Franklin’s timeless yet timely nonsectarian civic vision for Penn and for American democracy itself—a nonsectarian civic vision that models both robust respect for religious pluralism and a bedrock belief that sacred places, both on their own and via public-private partnerships, can and should serve secular purposes unto “the common good”—into a 21st century, university-anchored agenda of fact-based research on urban and other faith-based organizations; survey research on religion and democratic values in America; arts and sciences teaching relevant to religion; service-learning initiatives; and special events and projects that advance knowledge and promote mutual understanding concerning contemporary America’s most complex and contentious church-state issues.

On the Secular University and the Church

Reconsidering Newman’s Philosophy of Education Today

Penn Newman Catholic Center
Thursday, October 13, 2016

Dr. Don Briel, the Blessed John Henry Newman Chair of Liberal Arts at the University of Mary, launched the Inaugural John Henry Newman Lecture, speaking and answering questions at this first annual lecture marking the University of Pennsylvania as the site of the nation’s first Newman Club.

Here is a transcript of the Inaugural Newman Lecture.

 

Seeking the “Real” Francis of Assisi

Medieval Hagiography, Modern History, and Incarnational Theology

When: Tuesday, Sept 27th, 12:00-2:00pm

Where: Stiteler Hall, B26

A Collegium Institute luncheon lecture cosponsored by the Department of History, University of Pennsylvania

When Paul Sabatier published the first modern biography of St. Francis of Assisi in 1893, the medieval sources he favored and the approach he used to find the “historical Francis” behind the legends and myths triggered 100 years of contentious and often fierce debate about texts, interpretations, and proper historical method. By the 1980s many new sources had been discovered and the well-known ones had been meticulously edited and studied.  According to nearly all modern literary and cultural historians working on Francis, however, the historical man would always be hidden behind the source texts.  All that scholars could do was analyze the diverse “readings” of Francis produced by his medieval biographers.

Prof. Augustine Thompson proposes that this decision was a mistake and that the man behind the legends can be discovered, if not perfectly, with a high degree of certainty.  He demonstrated this conviction in his recent monograph, Francis of Assisi: A New Biography (Cornell Univ. Press, 2012), which has sold 70,000 copies over the last 4 years making it Cornell’s bestselling book of all time.  In this luncheon lecture, Thompson will explain the issues at stake, his approach, and the major changes of focus these imply.

Fr. Augustine Thompson, O.P. (born New York, 1954), is a Catholic priest of the Order of Preachers and Professor of History at the Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology and member of the Core Doctoral Faculty of the Graduate Theological Union, Berkleley CA. He holds a Ph.D in medieval history from the Univ. of California, Berkeley CA. Until 2009 he was Professor of Religious Studies and History at the Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville VA. His research focuses on medieval Italy and medieval religious history.  Among his monographs are Revival Preachers and Politics: The Great Devotion of 1233 (Cambridge, 2000); Cities of God: The Religion of the Italian Communes, 1125-1325 (Penn State, 2006; Winner of the ACHA Howard R Marraro Prize for best book published in Italian History 2006); and now Francis of Assisi: A New Biography, winner of the 2013 Ennio Flaiano Prize in Italian Studies.

Lunch will be provided to all registrants during the lecture.

Register Here or contact Elizabeth Feeney for more information: elife@sas.upenn.edu.

Summer 2016 Platonic Symposia

On Virtue in the Polis,
and in its Leadership

The Platonic Symposia of Donald Antenen, Collegium alumnus, will continue this summer under the direction of Dr. Anne Hall, Penn English Professor and moderator of Collegium’s inaugural Coffee with the Classics program.

This summer, in anticipation of the election this fall, the reading group will explore Plato’s Meno, Gorgias, and Protagoras. These three dialogues raise three questions–what is virtue and who teaches it? what is the connection between virtue and human happiness? and what is the connection between virtue and human dignity?

Participants will meet weekly to discuss these dialogues in a convivial setting with light refreshments. Copies of the dialogues will be awarded to committed participants while supplies last. Sessions will begin in mid-June on Penn’s campus and take place on a regular evening agreed upon by the participants.

The group will be organized by Mark Hoover, summer student fellow at the Collegium Institute. If you would like to participate, please contact him by May 31st at hooverm@sas.upenn.edu.  You may also sign up for the group by submitting this form.

Please join the Collegium Institute for Catholic Thought & Culture and
the Penn Newman Center for

Alumni Weekend 2016
Sunday, May 15th

Mass at 9:30 a.m.
St. Agatha – St. James Church
3720 Chestnut Street

followed by

Brunch at Penn Newman Center

and

Remarks by Mattt Manion W’92,
President of Catholic Leadership Institute

“What is the Laity in the Age of Pope Francis?”

RSVP here.

For questions, write to Katie Becker at kbec@sas.upenn.edu

The Organization Professor? With Dr. Anthony Grafton

When: Friday, April 15, 2016
12:00-1:30 p.m.
Where: Cohen Hall 402
University of Pennsylvania

Collegium’s Spring 2016 Humanities Forum will focus on a seminal essay of David Brooks, the New York Times Columnist who is Penn’s Baccalaureate Speaker this year and the recipient of an honorary doctorate of humane letters.

In “The Organization Kid”  (Atlantic Monthly, April 2001), Brooks argued that Princeton students and their classmates at peer institutions were arriving to college as professional résumé builders – they were hardly interested in learning for its own sake, let alone for their own personal or moral development.  The article stimulated a lively debate in its own time: was Brooks’s assessment fair or was it dependent upon a romantic notion of university life that never existed in any age?  From that point forward, Brooks continued to write about the nature, purpose, and transformation of American higher education.

Fifteen years later, we will revisit how the Organization Kids have grown up.   Some are back in the same place –elite colleges– this time trying to teach, and moreover to publish.  The pressure to produce in quantity has never been greater for faculty and grad students.  Does professors’ (necessary) participation in this system of retention and promotion have any impact upon the force of their erstwhile admonitions for students to eschew over-professionalization, pursue the liberal arts, take time to read widely and think deeply, etc.?   If indeed there is a systemic problem affecting professors as much as students, what might be done to address it?

This is a luncheon lecture — to reserve you place, please register here!  For questions contact Katie Becker at kbec@sas.upenn.edu

Featuring Dr. Anthony Grafton
Henry Putnam University Professor of History at Princeton University

Professor Grafton’s special interests lie in the cultural history of Renaissance Europe, the history of books and readers, the history of scholarship and education in the West from Antiquity to the 19th century, and the history of science from Antiquity to the Renaissance. Professor Grafton is the author of ten books and the coauthor, editor, coeditor, or translator of nine others.

He has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship (1989), the Los Angeles Times Book Prize (1993), the Balzan Prize for History of Humanities (2002), and the Mellon Foundation’s Distinguished Achievement Award (2003), and is a member of the American Philosophical Society and the British Academy. In 2011 he served as President of the American Historical Association.

Coffee with the Classics: Spring 2016

On Nature and Human Nature
Part II: From Galileo to Google

Students have been gathering this spring in continuation of a survey of Natural Philosophy begun last fall.  Sessions 1-3 covered the ideas of Galileo, Descartes, Bacon, Hobbes, and Newton.  Dr. Mike Kane facilitates.  Dinner, coffee, and all texts are provided free of charge for all participants.  Coffee with the Classics takes place Wednesday evenings in Harrison College House, Seminar Room M20.  A summary of previous sessions can be found at Collegium Portal.

Join us for special guest facilitators on March 24 and April 6!
Email Katie Becker (kbec@sas.upenn.edu) to register and get a copy of the readings.


Session 4: The Romantic Reaction
Wednesday, March 24, 2016, 6-7:30 p.m (dinner ready at 5:45)

Featuring special guest Dr. Michael Gamer

Associate Professor of English at Penn
Faculty Master at Harrison College House
The Romantic thinkers reacted against the excessive rationalism of the Enlightenment and the dehumanizing effects of industrialization.  In both of these areas, they challenged the existing ideas about human nature and the natural world.  The call to return to nature as a way of satisfying the human spirit was an essential part of the Romantic outlook, as was a sense of respect for the beauty of nature. Professor Gamer will be facilitating discussion on poems by Shelley and Wordsworth.


Session 5: Darwin
Wednesday, April 6, 2016, 6-7:30 p.m (dinner ready at 5:45)

Featuring special guest Dr. Peter Dodson
Professor of Veterinary Gross Anatomy
Professor of Earth and Environmental Science (paleontology)

Darwin’s Origin of Species was a scientific advance of enormous proportions, and one which represented nature in a new way.  For Darwin, nature is a self-evolving force, with a direction but with no telos as for Aristotle, and with selection but no design.  By showing humans as the product of evolution from lower species, Darwin also reshaped the discussion about nature and human nature (as well as faith and reason). Professor Dodson will be facilitating discussion on excerpts from Origin of Species and Darwin’s autobiography.


Session 6: The Human, the Natural, and the Artificial
Wednesday, April 20, 2016, 6-7:30 p.m (dinner ready at 5:45)

Featuring readings by B.F. Skinner, Ray Kurzweil, and Pope Francis

Skinner argued that we are simply the product of our environment and have little to no influence over nature.  We should therefore give up metaphysical ideas such as human freedom.  Kurzweil, chief futurist for Google, argues for the “Singularity”, the stage at which machine learning surpasses human intelligence and allows us to rewrite the human experience of the natural world.  This would culminate in personal immortality through technology.  Pope Francis makes the case for prudent restraints on technology as he urges us to correct for the excessive anthropocentrism of modern thought, and to care instead for the planet and the poor.

The Glossa Ordinaria as Medieval Bible Commentary

When: Wednesday, March 16, 2016 from 5:30-7 p.m.
Where: Kislak Center for Special Collections
Room 627 Van Pelt Library

Join us for a discussion of the Glossa Ordinaria led by E. Ann Matter, the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.  This discussion is part of “Reading the Bible in History”, a series for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty to engage with the text of the Bible, relevant commentaries, and other secondary sources to understand changing perceptions of the Bible throughout history.

Cosponsored by the University of Pennsylvania Department of History and Collegium Institute.

For more inquiries or more information, contact Katie Becker: kbec@sas.upenn.edu