The Enigma of Academic Success

On November 13, 2015, Collegium co-sponsored a panel with The Veritas Forum on surviving, thriving, and rediscovering the meaning of learning.  Featuring Francis Su, the Benediktsson-Karwa Professor of Mathematics at Harvey Mudd College, and Stewart Friedman, Practice Professor of Management at the Wharton School of Business and Director of the Wharton Work/Life Integration Project.

The Enigma of Academic Success

When: Friday, November 13, 2015 at 7:30 p.m.
Where: Huntsman Hall Auditorium (G-06) at the University of Pennsylvania

The Enigma of Academic Success: An Organizational Psychologist and Christian Mathematician discuss surviving, thriving, and rediscovering the meaning of learning. An honest encounter of two viewpoints, featuring Francis Su, the Benediktsson-Karwa Professor of Mathematics at Harvey Mudd College, and Stewart Friedman, Practice Professor of Management at the Wharton School of Business and Director of the Wharton Work/Life Integration Project. This event is cosponsored with the Veritas Forum.

Featuring:

Dr. Francis Su is the Benediktsson-Karwa Professor of Mathematics at Harvey Mudd College. He received his B.S. in Mathematics from the University of Texas at Austin and his Ph.D. from Harvard University. He is currently President of the Mathematical Association of America. His research is in geometric combinatorics and applications to the social sciences, and he has co-authored numerous papers with undergraduates. He also has a passion for teaching and popularizing mathematics. From the Mathematical Association of America, he received the 2001 Hasse Prize for expository writing, and the 2004 Alder Award and the 2013 Haimo Award for distinguished teaching. He authors the popular Math Fun Facts website and iPhone app. His hobbies include songwriting, gardening, photography, and theology. Just like mathematics, these are modes of creative expression that divinely blend structure and freedom, truth and beauty, reflection and action.

Dr. Stewart Friedman has been on the Wharton faculty since 1984.  He became the Management Department’s first Practice Professor for his work on applying theory and research to the real challenges facing organizations. As founding director of the Wharton Leadership Program, in 1991 he initiated the required MBA and Undergraduate leadership courses.  He is also founding director of Wharton’s Work/Life Integration Project.  Stew worked for five years in the mental health field before earning his PhD in organizational psychology from the University of Michigan.  He has published on work/life, leadership, and the dynamics of change, including the widely-cited Harvard Business Review articles, “Work and life: the end of the zero-sum game” (1998); “Be a better leader, have a richer life” (2008); and “Work+Home+Community+Self (2014); and “The Happy Workaholic: a role model for employees” (in Academy of Management Executive, 2003).  Stew’s most recent book is Leading the Life You Want: Skills for Integrating Work and Life (Harvard Business, 2014), a Wall Street Journal best-seller.

Biblical Genealogy: Sacred Lineages From Noah to Jesus

When: Thursday, November 5, 2015 at 12 noon
Where: Nevil Room, University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

 

This closing lecture by Dr. Jon D. Levenson, the Albert A. List Professor of Jewish Studies at the Harvard Divinity School, is the grand finale to the Sacred Writings Exhibition at the Penn Museum. This event is in partnership with the Museum, which, among other precious artifacts, will be showcasing its papyrus fragment of Matthew 1, one of the world’s oldest extant gospel fragments.  Lunch will be served.

Featuring:

Dr. Jon D. Levenson, Albert A. List Professor of Jewish Studies at Harvard Divinity School.  Professor Levenson’s work concentrates on the interpretation of the Hebrew Bible, including its reinterpretations in the “rewritten Bible” of Second Temple Judaism and rabbinic midrash.  He has a strong interest in the philosophical and theological issues involved in biblical studies, especially the relationship of premodern modes of interpretation to modern historical criticism. Much of his work centers on the relationship of Judaism and Christianity, both in antiquity and in modernity, and he has long been active in Jewish-Christian dialogue. Professor Levenson has published several books, the newest being The Love of God: Divine Gift, Human Gratitude, and Mutual Faithfulness in Judaism (Princeton University Press, 2015).  In all his work, emphasis falls on the close reading of texts for purposes of literary and theological understanding.

To reserve your place, please register here.  For more information, contact Katie Becker: kbec@sas.upenn.edu.

Nostra Aetate, 50 Years Later

The Past, Present, and Future of Inter-Faith Relations: Reflections on the 50th Anniversary of Nostra Aetate.

Cosponsored with the Religious Studies Department

 

When: Thursday, October 15, 2015 at 5 p.m.
Where: Shotel Dubin Auditorium in Steinhardt Hall (Penn Hillel), University of Pennsylvania

Issued in October 1965, Nostra Aetate was the Second Vatican Council’s seminal declaration on the relationship of the Church to other Faiths.  Situated two weeks after the historic visit of Pope Francis and two weeks before the visitation of the Dalai Lama, this special event presents an opportunity for the university to take stock of the transformation of inter-faith relations ushered in by this pivotal church document and to consider what still lies ahead.

Featuring:

Dr. Philip A. Cunningham is Professor of Theology and Director of the Institute for Jewish-Catholic Relations of Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, PA. He also serves as president of the International Council of Christians and Jews, secretary-treasurer of the Council of Centers on Jewish-Christian Relations, and has been a member of the Advisory Committee on Catholic-Jewish Relations for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. He is also webmaster of the CCJR’s online resource supersite called Dialogika. Interested in biblical studies, religious education, and theologies of Christian-Jewish relations, he is the author of numerous books and articles on these subjects. His most recent book is Seeking Shalom: The Journey to Right Relationship between Catholics and Jews (Eerdmans, 2015).

 

Dr. Daniel Mark is Commissioner of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom.  He is also an assistant professor of political science at Villanova University in Pennsylvania. He teaches political theory, philosophy of law, American government, and politics and religion. At Villanova, he is a faculty associate of the Matthew J. Ryan Center for the Study of Free Institutions and the Public Good and serves on the Jewish Religion and Culture Lecture Committee and the Graduate Committee of the Department of Political Science. Dr. Mark works with the Tikvah Fund in New York and the Hertog Foundation in Washington, DC, and he has taught at the Straus Center for Torah and Western Thought at Yeshiva University.

Dr. Heather J. Sharkey is an Associate Professor in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations (NELC) at the University of Pennsylvania. She received her Ph.D. in History from Princeton University after conducting research abroad on a Fulbright-Hays fellowship.  Before joining the Penn faculty in 2002, she taught at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Trinity College in Connecticut. She is the editor of Cultural Conversions: Unexpected Consequences of Christian Missions in the Middle East, Africa and South Asia (Syracuse University Press, 2013). Dr. Sharkey is writing a book for Cambridge University Press about the history of intercommunal relations in the modern Middle East.

Reception to follow

Please register here.  For more information, contact Katie Becker: kbec@sas.upenn.edu

 

Special Events in September

Thursday, September 17: What is the Meaning of the World Meeting of Families? A Discussion on Love, Vocation, and Human Fulfillment featuring Dr. Christopher Roberts, who is the principal author of the World Meeting of Families Catechism, and other panelists.  For further details and information on registration, click here.
Tuesday, September 22: The Family as Holy Anarchy. Special event at the Philadelphia Convention Center immediately preceding the World Meeting of Families. Dr. Mary Beth Yount, an assistant professor of theology at Neumann University, will MC. Dr. Fabrice Hadjadj, the French Catholic philosopher, author and convert from Judaism, will deliver the main comments on family-related issues, and Cardinal Mueller of the CDF and Dr. Anna Moreland of Villanova will offer brief responses. To register, please contact Katie Becker: kbec@sas.upenn.edu
Thursday & Friday, September 24-25: Religious Faith & Environmentalism Symposium
          o Thursday, Sept. 24,  5pm: Religious Faith & Environmentalism. Lecture by Thomas R. Dunlap (Texas A&M) with response by Justin McDaniel (Chair, Penn Religious Studies).  Reception to follow.
          o Friday, Sept. 25, 11:30am:Green Faiths? Laudato Si and other Religious Responses to Ecological Pressures. Panel featuring Brad Gregory (Notre Dame), Bethany Wiggin (Penn), Carolyn Fornoff (Penn), Mark Shiffman (Villanova), Cam Grey (Penn) and Ilana Schachter (Penn). Moderated by Mary Summers (Penn). Luncheon.
          o Friday, Sept. 25, 2pm: Keynote Address
For more information or to register, click here.

This Thursday: What is the World Meeting of Families?

 A Collegium-Newman Discussion on Love, Vocation, Friendship, and Human Fulfillment
When: Thursday, September 17th, 2015; 7:00 p.m.
Where: Upper Lounge, Newman Center (3720 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia)

Can’t make it with the thousands of others across the globe for the World Meeting of Families Congress at the Philadelphia Convention Center?  Please join us for this special presentation at Penn.
 

Dr. Christopher Roberts: Theologian.  Dr. Roberts is the primary editor and writer for the World Meeting of Families Catechism, Love is our Mission: the Family Fully Alive. His previous book was Creation and Covenant: The Significance of Sexual Difference in the Moral Theology of Marriage (2008). For several years he was a television journalist at PBS, including time as a reporter for the program Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly. Dr. Roberts completed his Ph.D. in theology at Kings College, University of London. He taught at Villanova University, and is currently studying for the permanent diaconate at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary. Chris and his wife Hannah recently welcomed their fourth child.

Ms. Caitlin La Ruffa: Director of the Love and Fidelity Network.  Caitlin is a frequent speaker, commentator and writer on marriage and sexual integrity.  She has been featured in The New York Times, WORLD Magazine, the National Catholic Register, National Review Online, and the Christian Broadcast Network.  She has been published in The Public Discourse, Mercatornet, AltCatholicah, and Verily Magazine.  Prior to joining LFN, Ms. La Ruffa graduated from Princeton University, worked at Bain & Company in New York, and began her career in the International Programs division of the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty.


Mr. Ron Belgau: Cofounder of Spiritual Friendship, an increasingly popular group blog dedicated to exploring authentic Christian teaching on friendship, especially in the context of homosexuality.  He is in the PhD program in philosophy at St. Louis University, where he teaches Ethics, Medical Ethics, Philosophy of Religion, and Philosophy of the Human Person. He has served on the steering committees for Bridges Across the Divide and the Seattle Archdiocesan Gay and Lesbian Ministry, as a group leader for Multifaith AIDS Projects, and as leader of the Gay Christian Network’s celibacy support forum. For more than a decade, he has travelled around North America speaking about Christian teaching and homosexuality. Many of his essays and speeches are available at CityofGod.net. He also blogs at First Things and Spiritual Friendship.

This special Newman Night event will take place immediately following Newman’s Thursday Night Dinner.  To be sure that we have adequate seating, it would be helpful if you claim a space in advance with Katie Becker: kbec@sas.upenn.edu

Platonic Summer Symposium

All are invited to participate in the Collegium Institute’s summer Plato reading group at the University of Pennsylvania. This year we are reading The Republic. We will read one book per week through June and July and meet to discuss each reading in an informal setting. The group will meet on Mondays at 6:30 pm, beginning on June 1st. The location will be determined shortly. Participants should read Book I before the first meeting.

The reading group is organized by Donald Antenen, the summer fellow at the Collegium Institute. If you would like to participate, please email dantenen@sas.upenn.edu.