UA-89062218-1

Speaking Truth to Power:

How much free speech is necessary at the university today?

A Food for Thought Module

When: Wed, 1/31 | 2/7 | 2/14 | 2/21; 5:45 — 7:00 pm

Where: Harrison College House

Not since the 1960’s has there been so much speech about speech on college campuses.  Such conflicts challenge us to reflect upon issues fundamental to the university itself, including the purpose of education, the freedom of inquiry, the power of language, and the moral boundaries of community.  Join us on our quest to make sense of what’s at stake and to grapple together toward a way forward, building upon the centuries-long debate among Plato, John Stuart Mill, Judith Butler, George Orwell, and others in a relaxed community of committed—if not necessarily like-minded—students.

Food for Thought invites undergraduate students of the University of Pennsylvania to explore perennial questions with the aid of good food and powerful texts but without the pressure of grades or papers.

Free Texts and Dinner are provided for registered participants.

Reserve your free dinner and texts by emailing Elizabeth at elife@sas.upenn.edu.

“To Be Deep in History:” Newman on the Gift of Tradition

When: Thurs, Feb 8, 2018 at 7:00 pm

Where: Penn Newman Center, Upper Lounge

3720 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA, 19104

 

2nd Annual John Henry Newman Lecture

featuring

Professor Thomas Pfau

Duke Divinity School

 

This lecture will explore J. H. Newman’s understanding of tradition and its relevance for humanistic and theological inquiry today. Newman is the first to contest the Enlightenment’s critique of tradition as backward, static, and as inherently prejudicial to social, political, and intellectual progress. Moving beyond the prevailing cultural and intellectual movements of the Romantic era – those of historicism and sentimentalism – Newman’s 1845 Idea of Development of Christian Doctrine outlines an understanding of tradition that proved remarkably prescient of developments in twentieth-century philosophical theology and scriptural hermeneutics. Above all, Newman shows that the many voices that comprise a tradition amount to a gift of sorts. We honor it by receiving it, not as a possession but as a temporary trust, a palimpsest of voices inviting us to interact with them and, in so doing, discover and cultivate our own voice and reason.

Join the Collegium Institute and the Penn Newman Center for this annual lecture marking the legacy of the University of Pennsylvania as the first Newman club in the United States.

RSVP HERE

Please direct any questions or comments to Elizabeth Feeney at elife@collegiuminstitute.orgRead more

Theory & Theology

a Graduate Fellows Initiative
  • January 8: Michel Foucault
  • February 5: Roland Barthes
  • March 5: Jacques Derrida
  • April 9: Affect Theory
  • May 7: Antonio Gramsci
The “household names” of the contemporary academy are often cited, but only occasionally read. The Collegium Institute invites graduate students to consider the work of these influential intellectuals under the auspices of its newest reading group: Theory and Theology. Designed for those with limited or no prior experience reading the authors, the group will examine one important text each month, sometimes in conjunction with a Christian text.  Meetings, convened at lunchtime on the first Monday of the month, are set to discuss the following: Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, Jacques Derrida, Affect Theory, and Antonio Gramsci.
Space is limited, so please contact Katie Becker at kbec@sas.upenn.edu by to reserve your place.

Call for Undergraduate Collegium Fellows

 

Deadline for Applications: Dec. 31st

 

     Collegium undergraduate fellows serve on the executive committee of the Collegium Institute Student Association at Penn.  In that capacity, fellows help design Collegium undergraduate programming, committing to a minimum of two programming meetings per year.  Depending upon the fellows’ own particular interests, they might help design Food For Thought, the Paideia Seminar, the Faith & Reason seminar, as well as special events and new programs like Friday Underground Coffees and Faculty Table Talks.

    More broadly, the fellows form an intellectual community at Penn committed to exploring the past, present, and future of academic learning as a whole.  Student fellows show varying degrees of interest in the meaning of the liberal arts, the promise of the research university, and the study of the intellectual tradition of Catholicism or other religions in both contexts.  All, however, seek to reflect together upon the inter-relation of knowledge across the university.  They pursue the questions that transcend the disciplines, while striving to draw wisdom from each other in the process.

      To apply for an undergraduate fellowship, please submit a Statement of Interest in Collegium (150-300 words).  Your statement might relate to specific CI programs or more general questions, including but not limited to:

– the relationship between the liberal arts and cutting-edge knowledge

– the relationship between faith and reason

– the search for a meaningful humanism today

    Please note, the Fellows Program is open to Penn students of all faiths and of none.

    The review committee will continue to process applications until all spots are filled. Please direct all documents and questions to me at elife@sas.upenn.edu.    

The Legacy of the Reformation

After 500 Years

To commemorate the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation, Prof. Carlos Eire (Yale) returned to Penn to provide a reflection on the lasting legacy of the Reformation.  Listen below to hear some of his thoughts on the Reformation, its influence, and its commemoration through history.

Stay tuned for a video of the lecture and a personal interview with Prof. Eire about his recent book, Reformations (2016).

Darwin, God, and the Cosmos:

Is Faith Still Relevant in a

Scientific World?

When: Thurs, Nov. 30th at 7pm

Where: Stiteler Hall Rm. B6, 208 South 37th Street

Cosponsored by: Penn Laboratory for Understanding Science (PLUS), Penn Forum for Philosophy, Ethics, and Public Affairs, and the Program for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society (PRRUCS).  Funding by the John Templeton Foundation.

Modern science has its roots in western religious thought and owes some of its greatest discoveries to scientists who themselves were people of faith.  Nonetheless, on one issue after another, from evolution to the “big bang” to the age of the Earth itself, religion seems to be at loggerheads with scientific thought.  Perhaps, as some suggest, we are approaching the end of faith.  Is this conflict inevitable, or is there a way science can be understood and supported in a religious context?

Join The Magi Project as they welcome Prof. Kenneth Miller (Brown) for this keynote lecture approaching questions of conflict between religion and science through the contentious issue of biological evolution.

Please RSVP HERE

Questions can be directed to Elizabeth Feeney at elife@sas.upenn.edu. Read more

Carols by Candlelight

 

When: Wed, December 6th, 5:30 pm

Where: Sts. Agatha and James Church

             3728 Chestnut St., Philadelphia

 

Collegium and the Church of Sts. Agatha and James welcome all to a joyful, ecumenical choral service celebrating Christmas with the Penn community.  Join fellow students, professors, and performing arts groups for an evening of Lessons & Carols.  The evening will conclude with a dessert reception.

RSVP TODAY

Please direct any questions to Elizabeth Feeney at elife@collegiuminstitute.org. Read more

Utopias/Dystopias:

How to Assess Science Fiction and the Best (or Worst) Possible Worlds

When: Wednesdays, 11/1, 11/8, & 11/15, 5:45pm-7:15pm

Where: Harrison College House

 

What would the ideal world look like?  What role would technology play in that ideal world?  We will search for the answers to these questions and more through the world of science fiction and short stories.  Together with a faculty moderator, we will explore imaginary worlds of film and literature to better understand the goals and desires of our own.

RSVP to Elizabeth Feeney if you are interested in attending

 


 

Food for Thought is a seminar for engaging foundational questions without the stress of grades or papers.  This informal seminar forum setting provides an opportunity to read and discuss some of the most influential and provocative thinkers of the ancient and modern Western Tradition.

Yoga & Catholic Novels:

How to Make Sense of Religion in the Modern World

 

When: Tuesday, Nov. 14th at 7:00 pm

Where: Penn Newman Center, 3720 Chestnut St

Join Collegium Institute and the Penn Newman Center for a keynote lecture by returning Collegium Faculty Fellow, Prof. Clemens Cavallin on expressions of religion in modern society. Dr. Cavallin will explore these modern expressions of ritual practice and show us what religious significance of contemporary cultural phenomena, including mainstream yoga and Catholic apocalyptic novels.

Please direct any questions to Program Coordinator, Elizabeth Feeney: elife@collegiuminstitute.org.


Prof. Clemens Cavallin

Dr. Clemens Cavallin is Senior Lecturer and Associate Head of Department for Internationalization at the Department of Literature, History of Ideas, and Religion at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. He is Visiting Instructor of Religion & STINT Fellow in the Department of Religion at Haverford College, Pennsylvania, during the fall semester 2013. Dr. Cavallin’s research interests are broad and include Hinduism, Ritual theory and Catholic Studies. His thesis The Efficacy of Sacrifice (2002) was within the first field, more precisely focusing on Vedic sacrifices, while his second book, Ritualization and Human Interiority (2013) is within the second field of ritual theory. He most recent work, On the Edge of Infinity, to be published this year, is a biography on Canadian Catholic artist and novelist, Michael D. O’Brien.

Currently, he is directing the research project Religion on Campus: A Study of Views on Religion at Two Indian Universities together with professor Åke Sander. The focus is on the relation between Indian forms of secularity and the academic study of religion.   In 2017, he will begin to work on a new research project called Christian Yoga which will investigate Christian responses to the popular modern forms of yoga.