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Food for Thought Module IV: Memory, History, Identity

As we begin the new year and (re)assess our resolutions, we may confront the question: who do I want to become in 2020?  That may seem like a bigger existential question than we may have bargained for on New Year’s Eve. But to what extent does it depend on other questions, no less profoundly existential, that we may be more likely to take for granted; that is:

  • How do I know who I am to begin with?  
  • Do I not sometimes (or regularly) forget important aspects of my life?  
  • How does what I choose to remember — and to omit — in the narrative of my self determine my identity?   
  • How simple is that ubiquitous piece of advice to “just be yourself”?

Join Collegium and Harrison College House for dinner as we continue to reflect together on these questions with the help of brief, provocative texts from the past and present. 

The Art of Being Human: St. Cecilia in Poetry, Music, & Art

Join us for a joyous celebration with live music, poetry, art, and feasting at the Princeton University Art Museum

As part of this year’s Being Human Festival on the theme of ‘Discoveries and Secrets,’ the Collegium Institute, working in conjunction with the Princeton Humanities Council, the Carl Scmitt Foundation, and the Princeton University Art Museum, is proud to sponsor ‘The Art of Being Human: St. Cecilia in Poetry, Music, and Art.’

Centered on Edward Burne Jones’s luminous stained glass portrait of the pensive Saint Cecilia, this event will feature a screening, a poetry tour, a reception, a concert, and a roundtable conversation in an interdisciplinary effort to explore depictions of Saint Cecilia across different art forms from different centuries. 

DETAILS
Date: Thursday, Dec 12
Time: 2:30 pm-9:00pm
Location: Princeton University (McCormick 101 and Princeton University Art Museum)

This event is FREE and open to the public, but space in the Art Museum is limited, so attendance to the portions located there will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

For more information, please contact Joe Perez-Benzo at jperezbenzo@collegiuminstitute.org. To RSVP on Eventbrite, please follow this link.

St. Nicholas Day Party

Join the Collegium Institute for an end of semester celebration! 

We’ll celebrate with joy and cheer, anticipate what’s to come in the Spring, and gather as a Collegium community. There may even be a special St. Nicholas surprise in your shoe!

There will also be an announcement about new plans for an elected executive committee for the undergraduate fellows! 

Please join us between 3pm and 5pm in the 2nd Floor Conference Room at Fox-Fels Hall, on Friday, December 6th!   We’ll have hot drinks, festive desserts, poems to read (feel free to bring a favorite Christmas poem or story to share!) and more!  

DETAILS

Date: Friday, 12/6/19
Time: 3-5 P.M.
Location: 2nd Floor Conference Room, Fox-Fels Hall

Interested in coming? RSVP at this link!

Expolanets, Extraterrestrials & the Wonders of Creation: A Magi Project Lecture

The Collegium Institute presents the Fall 2019 Magi Project Lecture:

Exoplanets, Extraterrestrials & the Wonders of Creation

We inhabit a new cosmology where every star is a stellar system, with planets of its own. Some of these new-found worlds are similar enough to Earth that they may be hospitable to extraterrestrial life. In this lecture, Karin Oberg, Professor of Astronomy and Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of Astronomy at Harvard University, will introduce the latest science on exoplanets, on what constraints we have of their composition, including their likelihood of having water and organics, and how we can use this data to speculate about the likelihood of extraterrestrials. She will further meditate on what the existing discoveries are teaching us about creation and the Creator, as well as how the potential future discovery of extraterrestrials could affect our understanding of our relationship with God and of the Incarnation.

Each year Collegium holds two Magi Project lectures, one in the Fall, another in the Spring.  The Collegium Institute’s Magi Project for Science & Theology hosts and delivers courses, talks, seminars and other outreach activities in science and faith, helping people to think about their understanding of the physical Universe and their relationship with God, and how these ideas fit together in a complimentary way.  We seek to build dialogue between science and faith, helping people of faith to grow in their understanding of science, and helping scientists to understand the perspective of people of faith.

This event is co-sponsored by the Penn Catholic Newman Community and the John Templeton Foundation.

Thursday, 11/21/19
7 – 8:30pm
Lower Lounge of the Penn Catholic Newman Center
Reception to Follow

RSVP: please register through Eventbrite.

The Marvel of Creation: Fall 2019 Food for Thought Module III

D E S C R I P T I O N

What does it mean to be an animal, and what does it mean to be a person? What is life? How ought we think about and relate to God’s Creation in light of these things? These weighty questions will be central to the third Food for Thought Module of the Fall semester.

Dr. Janice Chik, Barry Foundation Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania and Director of Collegium Institute’s Magi Project, will facilitate this module, drawing from diverse thinkers and texts to help students explore these ideas both philosophically and scientifically.

Potential topics for discussion include animal and human consciousness, the possible role of a creative deity within the evolution of creaturely life, questions about “natures” or “essences” in Creation, animal ethics, and the roles of and relationship between science and philosophy in exploring these ideas. 

Please find the digital reader here.

D E T A I L S

Dates: Wednesdays, November 13, 20 & December 4
Time: 5:45 – 7pm
Location: Harrison College House, Seminar Rm. M20
Open to undergraduate students.

Dinner and Reader provided.

RSVP here to save your spot and secure a copy of the reader.

The Common Good and the Future of Capitalism: Public Lecture

Join the Collegium Institute for a lively panel discussion featuring:

-Marcia Pally, New York University, Fordham and Humboldt University

-Mark Reiff, University of California, Davis

-Jesus Fernandez-Villaverde, University of Pennsylvania

Moderated by Dr. Mike Kane (Collegium Institute & PRRUCS)

Capitalism is threatened by stagnant wages, the fear of recession, and a growing sense that the economy is “rigged” in favor of the rich. Where lies its future? Can capitalism be ordered to the common good? Is the field of finance part of the problem or the solution?

This panel is open to the public and serves as the kick off to our two-day long conference exploring the titular theme. For more information on the conference and to register for that click here.

DATE: Tuesday, October 29th

TIME: 7:00 – 8:30pm

LOCATION: Auditorium in the Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics (PCPSE)

If you have any questions, please reach out to our program & communications coordinator Jessica Sweeney at jferro@sas.upenn.edu

The Common Good and the Future of Capitalism: Conference

UNTIL OCTOBER 18 ONLY: Use the code FlashSale50 to get your tickets for 50% off!

Capitalism is threatened by stagnant wages, the fear of recession, and a growing sense that the economy is “rigged” in favor of the rich.  Where lies its future? Can capitalism be ordered to the common good? Is the field of finance part of the problem or the solution?

The Collegium Institute is bringing together leading scholars and practitioners in the fields of finance, ethics, and theology for our conference on “The Common Good and the Future of Capitalism.”

This event is co-sponsored by The Carol and Lawrence Zicklin Center for Business Ethics Research at the Wharton School of Business.

Topics Include: 

Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations

Payday Lending and the Underbanked

Financial Markets and the Common Good

Featured Speakers:

Marcia Pally, New York University, Fordham and Humboldt University

Lisa Servon, University of Pennsylvania

Mark Reiff, University of California, Davis

Nick Bosch, Money Mart

Mark Mulholland,  Matthew 25 Fund

and more!

Dates: Tuesday Oct 29 – Wednesday Oct 30

Location: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Registration Fees: 

  • General: $200
  • Young Professionals: $120
  • Penn Faculty: Free
  • Non-Penn Faculty: $100
  • Cocktail Hour and Banquet Only: $50

To learn more, view the full lineup, and register for the conference, please click here!

In/Justice: Fall 2019 Food for Thought Module II

DESCRIPTION

Food for Thought continues with the second module of Fall 2019! Talk about justice abounds. We are deeply concerned with what others—or perhaps we?—are due.  Yet, for all this, we have deep disagreement about the nature of justice and its import for the world.  What does it mean to be just, and how can we develop that virtue as individuals and a society? 

Topics include justice as a virtue, interpersonal justice, and justice as a social virtue. Participants will explore the work of diverse thinkers, from Plato to Thomas Aquinas; from Fyodor Dostoevsky to Martin Luther King Jr.; from Josef Pieper to W.H. Auden, and more. 

Physical copies of the reader will be provided at each session. Please find a digital copy of the reader HERE.

DETAILS

Dates: Wednesdays, October 2, 16, & 23
Time: 5:45 – 7pm
Location: Harrison College House, Seminar Rm. M20
Open to undergraduate students. Dinner and reader provided. 

RSVP here to save your spot and secure a copy of the reader!

Whom do we Trust? Fall 2019 Food for Thought Module I

Description

In collaboration with the Year of Data, we are excited to announce the first module of the 2019 Academic Year, Whom do we Trust…? Or…how do we know what we know?  We will once again host our Food for Thought series (FFT) co-sponsored by and hosted in Harrison College House.

During our first module, we’ll explore questions of knowledge, self, and trust. We will explore thinkers like Descartes and Augustine, but also W.H Auden, A.A Milne, C.S. Lewisand Simone Weil, along with this year’s Penn Reading Project book Weapons of Math Destruction.

Please find the digital version of the reader here. Physical copies of the reader are available at each session.

Open to undergraduate students.

Dinner and Reader provided.

Details & Registration

Dates: Wednesdays, Sept. 4th – 25th

Time: 5:45 – 7pm

Location: Harrison College House, Seminar Rm. M20

Please RSVP here to save your spot and secure a copy of the reader.

Living the Humanities: The Pleasures of the Intellectual Life

Date & Time

9/20/19 | 7:00pm – 8:30pm

Event Description

Join the Collegium Institute for an evening conversation with Prof. Zena Hitz of St. John’s College, Annapolis. We’ll uncover the hidden freedom of an intellectual life and how to live out a life of the mind in whatever stage of life or field you find yourself in. Prof. Hitz recently received a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer Stipend to dive into this topic which she explores in her forthcoming book, Lost In Thought: The Hidden Pleasures of an Intellectual Life, slated for release from Princeton University Press this Spring.

This event is co-sponsored by the Thomistic Institute.

Registration

Location