UA-89062218-1

What does Athens have to do with Jerusalem?

a Faith & Reason series

 

 

When: Fridays, 2:00 – 3:00 pm

Starting Friday, Feb. 9th

2/9 | 2/16 | 2/23 | 3/9 | 3/16 | 3/23

Tertullian’s famous question, “What does Athens have to do with Jerusalem?” was rhetorical: Tertullian blamed Greek philosophy for leading Christians away from the truth.  In this seminar, we will take up this question again, pursuing it in light of its many levels of meaning.  We will explore the relations between philosophy and Scripture, the natural intellect and matters of faith, in order to discern models for the Christian intellectual life.

For more information and to RSVP, contact Elizabeth Feeney at elife@sas.upenn.edu.

Speaking Truth to Power:

How much free speech is necessary at the university today?

A Food for Thought Module

When: Wed, 1/31 | 2/7 | 2/14 | 2/21; 5:45 — 7:00 pm

Where: Harrison College House

Not since the 1960’s has there been so much speech about speech on college campuses.  Such conflicts challenge us to reflect upon issues fundamental to the university itself, including the purpose of education, the freedom of inquiry, the power of language, and the moral boundaries of community.  Join us on our quest to make sense of what’s at stake and to grapple together toward a way forward, building upon the centuries-long debate among Plato, John Stuart Mill, Judith Butler, George Orwell, and others in a relaxed community of committed—if not necessarily like-minded—students.

Food for Thought invites undergraduate students of the University of Pennsylvania to explore perennial questions with the aid of good food and powerful texts but without the pressure of grades or papers.

Free Texts and Dinner are provided for registered participants.

Reserve your free dinner and texts by emailing Elizabeth at elife@sas.upenn.edu.

“To Be Deep in History:” Newman on the Gift of Tradition

When: Thurs, Feb 8, 2018 at 7:00 pm

Where: Penn Newman Center, Upper Lounge

3720 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA, 19104

 

2nd Annual John Henry Newman Lecture

featuring

Professor Thomas Pfau

Duke Divinity School

 

This lecture will explore J. H. Newman’s understanding of tradition and its relevance for humanistic and theological inquiry today. Newman is the first to contest the Enlightenment’s critique of tradition as backward, static, and as inherently prejudicial to social, political, and intellectual progress. Moving beyond the prevailing cultural and intellectual movements of the Romantic era – those of historicism and sentimentalism – Newman’s 1845 Idea of Development of Christian Doctrine outlines an understanding of tradition that proved remarkably prescient of developments in twentieth-century philosophical theology and scriptural hermeneutics. Above all, Newman shows that the many voices that comprise a tradition amount to a gift of sorts. We honor it by receiving it, not as a possession but as a temporary trust, a palimpsest of voices inviting us to interact with them and, in so doing, discover and cultivate our own voice and reason.

Join the Collegium Institute and the Penn Newman Center for this annual lecture marking the legacy of the University of Pennsylvania as the first Newman club in the United States.

RSVP HERE

Please direct any questions or comments to Elizabeth Feeney at elife@collegiuminstitute.orgRead more