Poetry as Enchantment

a Paideia Seminar

 

When: Friday, April 21st at 5pm

Where: University of Pennsylvania

Join Collegium Institute and undergraduates across Philadelphia for this final session of Enchantment and Disenchantment in the Modern Era.  For our closing seminar, we will examine Poetry as Enchantment, under the esteemed direction of poets Prof. James M. Wilson and Chaplain Chaz Howard.  Through a poetry reading and discussion of literary criticisms, Dr. Wilson and Dr. Howard will guide us in an exploration of poetry, religion, and philosophy.

Please direct questions and RSVPs for this dinner to Elizabeth Feeney at elife@sas.upenn.edu.

Information about past sessions in this Paideia series may be found here.


As poets and scholars, this month’s guest speakers explore ideas of inspiration through the medium of poetry.  Dr. James Wilson (Villanova) blends his poetic work with his scholarship in religion, literature, and philosophy, while Dr. Chaz Howard (UPenn) enlists his various chaplaincy experiences from hospitals to universities to examine the human experience.

Professor James M. Wilson

James Matthew Wilson is Associate Professor of Religion and Literature in the Department of Humanities and Augustinian Traditions at Villanova University.  An award-winning scholar of philosophical-theology and literature, he has authored dozens of essays, articles, and reviews on subjects ranging from art, ethics, and politics, to meter and poetic form, from the importance of local culture to the nature of truth, goodness, and beauty.  Wilson is also a poet and critic of contemporary poetry, whose work appears regularly in such magazines and journals The New Criterion, Dappled Things, Measure, The Weekly Standard, Front Porch Republic, The Raintown Review, and The American Conservative, as well as in his six published books of poetry and scholarship.

 

 

Chaplain Chaz Howard

Dr. Chaz Howard is the University Chaplain at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to his service at Penn, he served as a chaplain in hospice and hospital and as a street outreach worker to individuals experiencing homelessness in Philadelphia. His writing has been featured in such publications as Black Arts Quarterly, Black Theology: An International Journal, Daily Good, Christianity Today’s Leadership Journal, and Slate.  He is the editor of The Souls of Poor Folk, which explored new ways of considering homelessness and poverty and The Awe and The Awful, a poetry collection, among others.   He shares life with his beloved wife, Dr. Lia C. Howard and their three daughters.  He sees his vocational calling to be to work for a communal increase in joy, peace, justice and love.

 

 

On Caring for Depression in our Patients and Ourselves

an Open Conversation about both Illness and Wellness

A How to Heal luncheon

When: Thurs, April 20, 1-2:00pm

Where: Jordan Medical Education Bldg, 503

This month, guest speakers Dr. Phil Gehrman, (Penn Sleep Center) and Dr. Richard Summers (Co-Director of Residency Training and Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, UPenn) come together to share how their ultimate sense of life and of human flourishing influences how they understand and treat depression.

This series in Medical Humanities is a monthly luncheon seminar that invites students across the healthcare community to engage with veteran practitioners and faculty on concrete, clinical issues that prompt more fundamental questions: what does it mean to heal? how does one measure wellness? how do doctors and nurses determine when their responsibility for making someone well is complete?  How is the flourishing of patient and caregiver related — or not?

RSVP to Program Coordinator, Elizabeth Feeney at elife@sas.upenn.

Information about past luncheons can be found here.


 

Dr. Phil Gehrman, Ph.D.             Dr. Richard Summers, MD 

Fourth Annual Anscombe Lecture in Ethics

When: Wed, April 5th, noon-1:30pm

Where: Terrace Room, Claudia Cohen Hall

249 S 36th Street

The Annual Anscombe Lecture in Ethics commemorates Elizabeth Anscombe (1919-2001), former Penn Professor of Philosophy and one of the most influential woman philosophers and Catholic intellectuals of the modern era.  

featuring:

Sir Roger Scruton

on

Art and Morality: on the Relationship between Aesthetics and Ethics

This year’s lecture is cosponsored by the Penn Departments of Philosophy and History, as well as the Program for Research in Religion and Urban Civil Society (PRRUCS).

Lunch provided. To reserve your place, register HERE.  For more information, contact Elizabeth Feeney: elife@sas.upenn.edu.


Sir Roger Scruton

Eminent writer and philosopher, Prof Sir Roger Scruton has for over three decades taught at institutions on both sides of the Atlantic including Birkbeck College, Boston University, and more recently, the University of Buckingham. He is an author of over forty books. In his work as a philosopher he has specialized in aesthetics with particular attention to music and architecture. He has written several works of fiction, as well as memoirs and essays on topics of general interest. He engages in contemporary political and cultural debates from the standpoint of a conservative thinker and is well known as a powerful polemicist. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and the British Academy. He has been officially honoured by the Czech Republic, by the City of Plzen and by Virginia’s General Assembly. In 2004 he received the Ingersoll Weaver Prize for Scholarly Letters. In 2015 he published 3 books all of which were chosen among people’s ‘books of the year’. In 2016 he was recipient of the Polish Lech Kaczynski Foundation’s Medal for Courage and Integrity, was awarded the Italian Masi Prize for the Culture of Wine in recognition of his book I Drink Therefore I Am (Bevo, dunque sono), and was knighted in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List.

CwtC Module V: On Science, Faith, and Culture: Conflict and Reconciliation

When: Wednesday, March 15, 22, and 29

Where: Harrison College House

How can ancient creation narratives be understood in light of modern astrophysics?  What does the experience of the founder of modern physics (Galileo) actually reveal about the relationship between science and the church?  Or the experience of the founder of the Big Bang Theory (LeMaitre) reveal about the relationship between science and the state?  How is religious belief still possible for scientists in the modern age? Has Cosmology become the “Religion for Intelligent atheists?”

Join us on a great adventure as we journey through intellectual history exploring the relationship between science, faith and culture.  Through a discussion of very brief but momentous texts, we’ll be asking ourselves deep and searching questions about the interaction of science and religious belief and about how this relationship has been portrayed, accepted and rejected in popular culture in times past and in the present day.

This informal dinner seminar is directed by Penn astrophysicist and Collegium Faculty Fellow, Dr. Marisa Cristina March.  Please contact elife@sas.upenn.edu with any questions. All dinner and texts provided.