CwtC Module III: Friendship, Then & Now

When: Wednesdays, 1/25, 2/1, 2/8 at 6:00pm

Where: Harrison House

“He who has friends, has no friend.”  This observation, perhaps lament, was derived not out of the Facebook generation, but rather out of Greek antiquity.  In his foundational treatise on Ethics, Aristotle reflected on the value of personal friendship, on what it takes     to count someone else a good friend and on what one might need to give up in order to be one.  And of course on whether it is possible to have many friends.  His conclusions have been continually absorbed and challenged over two millennia, addressing questions about human relationships that appear quintessentially modern. In this preceptorial/ informal dinner seminar, students and a faculty guide will read and discuss brief but momentous texts on friendship.  Among the great thinkers featured include Aristotle, Cicero, Chaucer, Montaigne, Emerson, Thoreau, Keats, and others.  Of course no papers or exams are required at the end!
Coffee with the classics is coordinated by Collegium and hosted at Harrison College House.  These three discussion seminars on Friendship will take place on Wednesday evenings, 6pm-7:20, on 1/25, 2/1, and 2/8.  Dinner is available at 5:45pm and is included with all texts to registrants.  Both beginning and experienced students from all schools are welcome.  Registration is limited to seminar-size.
Register at elife@sas.upenn.edu for texts and dinner.

How To Heal: Integrated Healing?

a New Medical Humanities Series

This new series in Medical Humanities is a monthly luncheon seminar that invites students across the healthcare community to engage with veteran practitioners and faculty on concrete, clinical issues that prompt more fundamental questions: what does it mean to heal? how does one measure wellness? how do doctors and nurses determine when their responsibility for making someone well is complete?  How is the flourishing of patient and caregiver related — or not?

Click HERE for the TEXT to our inaugural presentation. 

Integral Healing?
To what extent should clinicians be concerned with
both body and spirit?
Featuring
Dr. Brian Wojciechowski
President, Catholic Medical Association of Philadelphia

To register for upcoming luncheons, contact Elizabeth Feeney at elife@sas.upenn.edu.

How to Heal

A New Medical Humanities Series

This new series in Medical Humanities is a monthly luncheon seminar that invites students across the healthcare community to engage with veteran practitioners and faculty on concrete, clinical issues that prompt more fundamental questions: what does it mean to heal? how does one measure wellness? how do doctors and nurses determine when their responsibility for making someone well is complete?  How is the flourishing of patient and caregiver related — or not?

Please join Collegium for the inaugural luncheon seminar:  

Integral Healing?
To what extent should clinicians be concerned with
both body and spirit?
Featuring
Dr. Brian Wojciechowski
President, Catholic Medical Association of Philadelphia
Thurs, January 19th at noon
Jordan Medical Education Center
Lunch will be provided.

To register or for more information, please contact Elizabeth Feeney at elife@sas.upenn.edu.

 

Sacred Songs: an Evening of Music and Reflection

 with Composer and Professor of Music James Primosch

co-sponsored by the Penn Department of Music

When: Monday, January 23rd at 5:30pm

Where: Lerner Center, Room 101

201 South 34th Street

Penn faculty composer James Primosch presents a lecture/recital on his vocal music, featuring live performances by soprano Mary Mackenzie and pianist Eric Sedgwick.

In Primosch's work, idioms from 20th/21st century traditions intersect with materials gleaned from his work as a liturgical musician. While some of the songs provide fresh settings for old liturgical melodies and texts, others set contemporary poetry with newly devised music. The result is concert music that also fulfills a pastoral function, serving as a space for contemplation, and an act of praise.

Reception to Follow

Please RSVP HERE for this event.


james-primosch-full-photo

James Primosch studied composition at Cleveland State University, the University of Pennsylvania and Columbia University. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and multiple awards from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, his music has been performed by the Chicago Symphony, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, and soprano Dawn Upshaw, among many other ensembles and soloists. 20 of his compositions have been released on compact disc. He has served on the Penn faculty since 1988.

mary mack

Mary Mackenzie, soprano

eric sed

Eric Sedgwick, piano