UA-89062218-1

How Catholic Places Serve Civic Purposes: the Archdiocese of Philadelphia’s Economic “Halo Effects”

Wednesday, November 30th at 5:30pm
Penn Hillel, 2nd Floor
215 S. 39th St, Phila, PA, 19104

Cosponsor: Program for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society

Join Collegium Institute and the Program for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society (PRRUCS) as we mark the release of the new PRRUCS Report on Catholic Nonprofits in Philadelphia.  Keynote speaker, Most Rev. Charles J. Chaput, the Archbishop of Philadelphia, will reflect on the mission and significance of religious non-profits in history, and on their evolving place in civil society in the present.  The panel of scholars and non-profit leaders, moderated by Professor Ram Cnaan of Penn’s School of Social Policy & Practice, will then consider more specifically the contours of the “halo effect” that Catholic institutions in particular are supposed to be generating in Philadelphia today.

Keynote speaker: Charles J. Chaput, Archbishop of Philadelphia

Moderator: Dr. Ram Cnaan, Program Director, Program for Religion and Social Policy Research

Panelists:

~Joseph P. Tierney, Executive Director, Robert A. Fox Leadership Program

~Lorraine M. Knight, Executive Director, Nutritional Development Services, Archdiocese of Philadelphia

~A. Robert Jaeger, President, Partners for Sacred Places

Reception to Follow

RSVP HERE to attend this lecture.


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput joined the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin, St. Augustine Province, in 1965.  He was appointed Archbishop of Denver in 1997, and later appointed Archbishop of Philadelphia in 2011.

During his ministry, he has assisted in the founding of St. John Vianney Theological Seminary, an affiliate of the Pontifical Lateran University, as well as Centro San Juan Diego in Colorado, the national Catholic Association of Latino Leaders (CALL), and ENDOW, a leadership initiative of Catholic women to “Educate on the Nature and Dignity of Women.” He was also instrumental in creating the Denver-based Augustine Institute, an independent, lay-run graduate school for the formation of lay Catholic leaders, catechists, and evangelizers. Archbishop Chaput has served on various national and international committees for advancing religious freedom, in addition to serving as a board member for various Catholic educational institutions.  For the United States Catholic Conference of Bishops, Archbishop Chaput is currently Chair of the Subcommittee on Native American Catholics, and a member and consultant for several other committees.

In addition to numerous talks, pastoral letter, and articles, he has authored two books: Living the Catholic Faith: Rediscovering the Basics (Servant, 2001) and Render Unto Caesar: Serving the Nation by Living Our Catholic Beliefs in Political Life (Doubleday, 2008).

 

Dr. Ram A. Cnaan is a Professor and Director, Program for Religion and Social Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Policy & Practice. He is also the founder and Faculty Director the Goldring Reentry Initiative which works to reduce recidivism. Professor Cnaan received his doctorate degree from the School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh, and his B.S.W. and M.S.W. (both cum laude) from the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel. Professor Cnaan has published numerous articles in scientific journals on a variety of social issues (mainly faith-based organizations, volunteerism, social policy, and development) and serves on the editorial boards of 11 academic journals, as well as authored or edited several academic books.

Professor Cnaan is considered an international expert in the areas of faith-based social care, volunteering, prisoners’ reentry, and social policy. He lectures widely and teaches regularly in four countries.

 

Program for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society

The PRRUCS mission is to translate Benjamin Franklin’s timeless yet timely nonsectarian civic vision for Penn and for American democracy itself—a nonsectarian civic vision that models both robust respect for religious pluralism and a bedrock belief that sacred places, both on their own and via public-private partnerships, can and should serve secular purposes unto “the common good”—into a 21st century, university-anchored agenda of fact-based research on urban and other faith-based organizations; survey research on religion and democratic values in America; arts and sciences teaching relevant to religion; service-learning initiatives; and special events and projects that advance knowledge and promote mutual understanding concerning contemporary America’s most complex and contentious church-state issues.